Tag Archives: vision

Reflections on prayer and a car wash

day of prayer - praying

Praying as a staff at the World Concern Haiti office.

After having spent three days in southern Haiti last week, Martha and I hurried back to Port-au-Prince for World Concern’s annual global day of prayer on Thursday.  This was our first time to participate in this day and we were glad that we got to.  In the busyness of work and life it is so refreshing to spend an entire day with colleagues praying, singing and hanging out.  The purpose of the day was to give thanksgiving for the previous fiscal year (ours ends in June), pray for the upcoming one, and also pray for the people we work with.

We began the day with a combination of scripture reading, prayer, singing, testimonies from staff about the past year, and more prayer.  When we sing together, someone almost always brings print outs of the lyrics which I’m grateful for since my French is subpar.  Oh and another interesting tidbit is that most singing in church in Haiti is in French not Creole and in most churches in Port-au-Prince French is used in the sermons as well.  Anyway, I recognize some of the tunes but there are also other songs that are completely new to me.  Haitians sing loud and proud.  Their voices together are strong and resounding. Sometimes I try and sing along but other times it is nice to just listen.  Here is a little video from our day of prayer last week while we were singing to give you an idea.

[vimeo 69688867]
See what I mean?!  It’s really incredible to be surrounded by all that powerful singing.

The second part of our day, we visited a church nearby that has a cool ministry for street kids.  This was a chance to hear about how one church is reaching out to people in their neighborhood and pray for them.  The pastor of the church was there, along with about 15 kids that he is working with.

If you have spent any time in Port-au-Prince and have driven around, you have likely had a young guy come up to your car when stopped and ‘offer’ to give it a wipe down.  By ‘offer’ I actually mean they just start doing it and if you don’t wave them off repeatedly, you better have some money nearby.  These are the kids that the pastor at this church saw frequently on the street outside his church.  Some of these kids have parents, some don’t, some have a place to stay, and some are just on their own.  Before they met the pastor, most were not attending school and they spent their days dodging traffic trying to earn some money wiping down cars at intersections.

So the pastor, wanting to know these kids situation better, decided to get to know them.  This was in 2009.  At first, they didn’t want anything to do with him because they thought he was trying to take advantage of them or something.  After three months of talking to them, a few agreed to come in the church and chat.  The pastor said it helped that he usually had some food to share with them.  Over time the pastor built a relationship with about 15 of these kids and they began to trust him more.  He gave them food when he could, talked to them and told them about the Bible.  But he also had an idea of how to get them in school and at the same time give them an opportunity to earn money—a car wash.  He pitched his idea to the kids.

“I will help you start a car wash which each of you can work at.  With the money earned together, we’ll pay for everyone’s school and whatever is left will be split among you.”

The kids agreed and the work of setting up a car wash began.  At first it was a very small thing but the pastor eventually got the local magistrate to donate a piece of land and he found funding to build a building on the property and purchase the needed materials like a power washer, soap, cloths, water, etc.  Now the car wash is a fully functioning business, all of the 15 or so kids he originally began working with are in school, and they each are paid a wage for their work.  During the school year, the kids work on the weekends in shifts.  The car wash has plenty of room for growth but right now it is meeting the needs of the kids as originally envisioned.

To hear firsthand from several of these kids about the difference they see in their lives both spiritually and economically now compared with four years ago is amazing.  After meeting them at the church and hearing their stories, some of the World Concern staff members stood up to share a bit of encouragement with the kids.  After that someone from World Concern prayed for the church and the kids, and one of the kids prayed for World Concern.  Then we all ate lunch together and afterwards walked over to the car wash to see this thing for ourselves.  It was attractive from the outside and the property was well kept after walking through the gate.  There was one concrete ramp built for cars to drive up and a couple power washers nearby.  Inside the small building on the property was a shop selling beverages and random car accessories.

day of prayer - church

At the church praying with the pastor and kids.

Ourselves and the staff made our way back to the office and gathered again in the conference room.  Then we went around in a circle and each person shared about something from the day.  It was so encouraging!  We closed the day with more prayer for the church and those kids, then some of the staff members started discussing how we as a staff we could continue to bless and encourage those kids.  Not sure what they will come up with but it was certainly an impactful day for everyone.

Personally, there were three things that I took away from this day.

  1. Both personal and collective spiritual health is so important.  It’s easy to get wrapped up in work and everything else that goes on and forget my own spiritual life.  I realize (frequently) my need for Christ however I struggle to consistently set aside time and energy to pursue my relationship with him.  A colleague here in Haiti recently said, “We work out our bodies and eat and brush our teeth and everything but we also need to take care of our soul!”  Couldn’t have said it better.  Likewise, we cannot neglect the spiritual health of the community.  I’m thankful that each morning the World Concern staff gathers for a quick prayer together.  No better way to start the day.  I think it’s powerful when a group of people are working toward the same goal and all agree that God must be at the center.  This day of prayer was a good investment in the spiritual health of the staff here.
  2. I need to be intentional with people and persistent like the pastor was in pursuit of those kids.  It took three months for the pastor to get the kids to even talk to him.  What if he had given up after one or two?  I admire his relentlessness and want to also be more intentional.
  3. Haitian led interventions are here and are working; you just have to look for them.  There is so much more to Haiti than a rough history, poorly spent aid dollars, lots of missionaries, and poverty.  But if you are not familiar with Haiti and rely on the news for your information, it is no wonder this is what you would believe.  Unfortunately these kids’ story may never make it on CNN but what is happening in the lives of those 15 young people tells a different story than what you typically hear from the media.  This is encouraging and should be celebrated.  This story shows us that even with limited resources and no outside help initially, a sustainable Haitian led ministry is possible and can succeed.  We (the church, international community, foreigners, NGOs) should do everything possible to support these types of interventions without getting in the way.  Easier said than done of course but we must have that vision and start somewhere.

Investing in tomorrow

Sometimes you hear people refer to ‘seasons of life.’  This journey with World Concern is interesting because I feel like Martha and I are experiencing several small seasons within a relatively short amount of time.  As I look back on our journey thus far (primarily from the beginning of this year), I am reminded of some of these small seasons.  There was the season of preparing for our short trip to Haiti in June and then actually arriving and spending a week getting to know the people we will be working with and serving.  There was the season of travel in July, where we attended two family reunions and spent time with both of our families.

Well, today we begin another small season.  Martha and I arrived in Colorado Springs today where we will spend the next three weeks taking a course with Mission Training International (MTI).  This course is a “pre-field training program, which focuses on strengthening your skills for cross-cultural life and ministry.”  I would say that each of the small seasons we have experienced this year have, overall, strengthened and encouraged us as we prepare for full time ministry in Haiti.  I hope this will also be true of our time here in Colorado with MTI.

Before I go on, I have to tell you how awesome it is to be in Colorado again.  MTI has a really cool facility where we will be living and eating and learning for the next three weeks, that is nestled right up against the mountains.  What an amazing place to train, fellowship, and grow.   We are certainly blessed to be here.

Honestly, I was originally skeptical of how beneficial this training would be for us.  Not because it was not a solid program, but because at this point in our support raising process it is easy to place a higher priority on meeting with people over coffee and making phone calls to share about our work than spending time learning how to integrate into a new place.  Although I have only been here for an afternoon, I am glad to report that my skepticism is already wearing off.  I was reminded today, that it is equally important to invest in developing habits and learning skills now that will allow us to serve effectively for the long run.

There are a number of other individuals, couples, and families participating in this training as well.  We had our orientation meeting before dinner where we learned more about what the next three weeks will look like.  I expected that.  What I didn’t expect was to be assigned homework!  Martha and I have been up since 5 am and spent several hours on planes today so homework sounded like the last thing I wanted to do tonight.  I reluctantly opened my binder and flipped to the page that we were assigned.  The title is “An Inventory of My Spiritual Life.”  Not the first thing I would choose to explore after a long day!  However, as I began to read I realized how great these questions being asked are—questions about my prayer life, spiritual disciplines, and the role of scripture in my life.  Wow.  I must admit that in the busyness of life I probably would not take the time to consider these things.  So despite my original skepticism and tiredness, I am thankful for the opportunity to be here at MTI for the next three weeks.  This spiritual inventory will help me see where I am and where I can grow.  Hopefully in a couple more weeks I can say that I am at a stronger and healthier place spiritually than I was before.  If so, praise God.  I know that remaining healthy spiritually is what will sustain Martha and I whenever we do arrive in Haiti and begin our ministry.

 

Our story, in our words

We wanted to tell you a little more about our story and how we arrived at this point in our journey…

AUSTIN “For me it started in college where, while majoring in Global Studies, I quickly became fascinated with culture and the world we live in.  I also became aware of poverty and its implications on individuals and communities.  That this injustice could exist in our modern world bothered me.  James 1:27 says, Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.’  My reasoning was simple and my conviction strong; if the God I claim to follow and serve cares about this, then I must obey and ‘look after those in distress.’  I was not sure what God’s plan was for this desire to obey but I was willing.  This willingness took me to Amsterdam, Netherlands following graduation where I volunteered at a Christian youth hostel and ministered to backpackers and the city’s transient population.  It was during this time that I met a beautiful and passionate woman named Martha (yup my wife Martha) who shared my interest in people and poverty.  This opportunity in Amsterdam affirmed in me a desire to work closely with international people, especially those that are experiencing some kind of hardship and difficulty.  Upon returning to the U.S. and moving to Seattle, God provided me the opportunity to intern at a large non-profit organization for six months.  This experience gave me an in depth and ‘behind the scenes’ look at what it takes to run quality programs and partner with others in pursuit of alleviating poverty.  For those of you who know me, you know I am not a ‘cubicle kind of guy.’  But wow, I learned a ton and realized that working with the poor was something I wanted to be involved with long term.”

MARTHA “My journey began growing up in the Philippines.  Being there planted in me an interest in living among different cultures and gave me a heart for the poor.  I also had an interest in art, which brought me back to the US to study graphic design in college.  Upon graduation I had envisioned myself working in a design firm.  Instead, I had the opportunity to take part in an intercultural studies internship traveling through Europe and Africa gaining exposure to different cultures and ministries.  Another formative experience was the time I spent working at a youth hostel in Amsterdam.  Here I built relationships with travelers and used graphic design to assist with marketing.  Through these opportunities, I saw my passions for art, culture, and people come together.  It became clear that I wanted to continue being involved in creative communication, learning from other cultures, and participating in the transformation of people’s lives both physically and spiritually.  I was also sure that I wanted to spend the rest of life’s adventures and challenges alongside Austin (who I had met in Amsterdam).  And just as I believe God led us together, he has led us to this opportunity with World Concern that allows me to use each of these passions.”

Following our wedding, Martha and I began looking for opportunities to serve together abroad.  Some things clearly became closed doors.  However we were patient, knowing that God had placed this desire on our hearts for a specific purpose.  This became clear as soon as we began having conversations with the people at World Concern.  We discovered that they, like us, are truly and passionately committed to serving the poor.  God has been preparing us for this position with World Concern, and we are humbled by the opportunity to walk alongside the Haitian people.

Our vision is that Haitians will experience freedom from oppression and be given the opportunity to live life in all its’ fullness–physically, relationally, and spiritually.  As Christ said himself in the Gospel of John, “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.”  What a beautiful promise.  This is what we desire for the people of Haiti and what we believe is possible.  Help us fulfill this vision.