Konferans Agrikol and Seeing Potential

I recently read a blog that began with the words, “Haiti is a country known for its statistics.” Such statistics being the not so good ones such as majority of the population living on less than $2 a day and tens of thousands dead following the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in 2010. As this blog said and as I believe too, “Haiti is full of potential” despite these statistics and the bad press the country often gets.

This potential is often best seen within Haitians themselves.  They are people very capable of becoming change makers in their families, communities, and country.  I was reminded of this recently when Martha and I attended a five-day agricultural conference called ‘Konferans Agrikol.’

The goal of the conference was to bring together delegates from across northern Haiti who are actively working in agriculture and sustainable development for exchange, cross-learning, stimulating presentations, and hands-on workshops.

banner The conference was hosted at L’Université Chrétienne du Nord d’Haïti’s (UCNH) beautiful campus in Limbe and coordinated by our good friend and Christian Veterinary Mission (CVM) missionary Rhoda Beutler, who is actually an agronomist.  Rhoda worked closely with a committee made up of UCNH faculty and a couple others from organizations in Limbe and Cap-Haitian.  There were also many other volunteers who put a lot of effort into making this conference come together.

Martha and I were representing World Concern at the conference and also documenting the conference through photos, videos, and interviews so that materials can be produced to attract delegates for future conferences throughout Haiti.

martha and interns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additionally Martha gave a short photography training to the conference’s interns who were responsible for take photos of what they saw throughout the week and then sharing highlights with everyone at the end of the conference.

first evening sessionThe first evening was spent giving a presentation of activities for the week and introductions.  As introductions in Haiti can take a long time (an open floor is just too enticing) delegates were encouraged to take 3 minutes to introduce themselves and the area of their work.

We didn’t get to everyone that first evening but right away I was impressed with the high level of interest and capacity shown by the delegates who introduced themselves.  Delegates were representing churches, grassroots groups, non-government organizations, and peasant organizations but all were focused on agriculture and sustainable development.

delegates in session

Presentations were given almost daily throughout the week on topics such as: soil conservation, animal husbandry, new and improved agricultural techniques, and even the chikungunya virus which has been wreaking havoc in Haiti the past few months.

While the presentations had a lecture feel, there was often discussion and comments from the delegates, each sharing their insight and asking questions.  The fact that the conference created a space for cross-learning was the most unique aspect in my opinion because everyone had the opportunity to benefit from each other’s experience.

friends at breakfast

UCNH was an ideal place to host the conference because as a university it has a dormitory, cafeteria, and meeting facilities, not to mention lots of space outdoors.  I told Martha it reminded me of summer camp for adults!  Here are some of our new friends enjoying breakfast before the day began.

making compost

In addition to presentations, the conference also organized several hands-on workshops. This is a photo of the compost workshop.  Some of the delegates were familiar with composting already but it was new for others.  This workshop and the others were valuable because they involved ‘learning by doing’ not just listening.

dr kelly

Dr. Kelly Crowdis (center, at the table), also with CVM, gave a workshop on diseases which can be transferred between animals and humans.  This workshop was very conversational and delegates took turns sharing stories and asking questions.

nivo a wide shot

Any idea what these delegates are doing?  This workshop was about the “Nivo A” (or A-frame) technique which is used in contour farming and helps prevent water runoff and soil erosion.  Obviously this is a very important and relevant technique for people working in agriculture in Haiti to know.  I sure learned a lot!

mfk visit

Later in the week, there was a day of field visits.  Three field visits were organized in total to three different organizations doing unique or new work in the region and each delegate was given the opportunity to choose one.  Martha and I helped lead the visit to the Meds & Food for Kids (MFK) factory and experimental peanut plots (pictured above), and to Carbon Roots International’s production site.

inside mfk

MFK makes a nutritious and peanut based ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) paste for malnourished kids in Haiti.  They work closely with local peanut producers in the region and teach them about growing and storing this crop.  MFK produces this paste in Haiti and has a beautiful facility (pictured above) which we also toured.

Green Charcoal (1)

These photos are from Carbon Roots’ production site.  They are all about sustainable charcoal technologies.  Haiti continues to see its trees chopped down to fuel the ever hungry charcoal industry; contributing to many problems such as climate change and environmental degradation.  Carbon Roots is trying to provide another option–treeless charcoal or “green charcoal” made from agricultural waste like sugar cane and corn refuse.

The staff at both sites were very hospitable and receptive.  The delegates were very curious about the work both of these organizations are doing and hopefully encouraged them to think outside the box in terms of how their own organizations operate and function.  Local ingenuity is certainly present in this country, it just needs to be channeled in the right direction and I think these field visits helped delegates see what is possible.

group photo

What a good looking group of people!  It was refreshing to spend a few days with these remarkable people.  I walked away feeling very encouraged because I met many people who love Haiti and are working diligently to help people in this country live more healthy and productive lives.  Haiti has tremendous potential and there is so much more to this place than statistics.  Things are changing for the better, albeit slowly, and it’s fun to see a glimpse of that happening from the ground up.

Photo Essay: One-of-a-kind Latrines

Desroulins, Latrines Nursery_006

Pastor Marc shows us a newly built latrine in Desroulins

“It’s a big problem in this area,” said Pastor Marc.

We were standing in the shade of a tree in Desroulins, a small community in North West Haiti.  Near us was a newly built latrine–the ‘toilet seats’ still drying in the sun.  Pastor Marc is a mason and was responsible for overseeing the latrine work done in Desroulins by World Concern in partnership with the community.

We were talking about open defecation–the practice of relieving oneself outside.  That’s the problem Pastor Marc was referring to.  Open defecation leads to an assortment of diseases including cholera, typhoid, hepatitis, polio, and diarrhea.  Many people in this area simply don’t have a toilet.

And I’ll stop right there.  This is meant to be a teaser.  Teased?!  Martha posted a very interesting photo essay on the World Concern blog yesterday about these recently built latrines and two of the people who will use them.

Here’s the link.  Head there for the rest!

 

Stories and Photos: We need help!

Recently there was something a little different going on just outside the World Concern office in Port-au-Prince.  One of our co-workers was ‘pushing’ a parked van, another was ‘washing’ their hands under a faucet, and you could see someone else ‘watering’ the plants.  They weren’t actually pushing, washing, and watering; they were having their pictures taken.  We were practicing photography!

noel washing

It’s exciting to work toward something with others.  It’s also important to recognize when you need help.  Martha and I have realized we need to put more energy into collaborating with and leaning on our co-workers here at World Concern when it comes to stories and photos.

We all need photos and stories.  Our co-workers write reports of their activities and insert photos and write short stories about the people they are serving.  We do the same, primarily for fundraising and advocacy purposes in the U.S.  So why, we asked ourselves, don’t we work together more on this?

Since the introduction of our communication liaison position a year and a half ago, we have seen an increase in the quantity and quality of stories and photos collected in-country, but we know we could accomplish more if we worked even closer with the World Concern staff that are interacting with people in the field each week.

By working with our co-workers to create a system of storing and sharing collected information and exposing them to some tips and tricks of interviewing and photography, we hope to (a) create a spirit of collaboration, (b) further develop the skills of our co-workers in these areas, and (c) capture more stories to show our supporters exactly what we’re doing and who we’re serving.

We recently held our first training session on all this with our microcredit co-workers in Port-au-Prince and we had a little fun with photography practice.  They will each collect a story with photos in the next month and we’ll meet again in July to see what went well and what can be improved.  To make it even more exciting, we are having a little contest to see who conducts the best interview and takes the best photos.

Martha 1

Martha sharing about why we collect stories and photos.

They say that two minds are better than one.  Well how about a whole team full of creativity.  We’re excited to see how this journey of working together to collect stories continues to progress.

lesly & van

austin & staff 2

Checking out the finished product.

Role playing 1

Role playing!

Chicken-what?

It is quiet at our Port-au-Prince office this week.  Office doors are shut and lights are turned off.  There is less chatter coming from the cafeteria at lunch time.  No, people are not on vacation.  Unfortunately several are out sick with a mosquito-borne virus called Chikungunya.  Oh and that’s not a typo.  The first few times I said it, it came out sounding more like chicken-something.

Everyone is talking about Chikungunya.  Over the past two weeks it seems I have not gone a couple hours without having a conversation about it.  The Chikungunya first arrived in the Caribbean in late 2013 and has quickly spread throughout the region.  The first cases in Haiti were reported in early May.

The virus causes joint pain, rash and fever but is not fatal.  One friend (who is young) told me the pain was so bad in his joints it made him feel like an old man!  Some people have been calling the virus kraze zo which means “broken bones” in Kreyol.

Quite literally, people are dropping like flies.  I can think of 10 co-workers who have had Chikungunya in the past two weeks and many people in our church community have gotten it too.  Apparently this kind of virus spreads very fast.  It doesn’t help that we’re in the middle of rainy season here in Haiti which means there are lots of places for mosquitos to make babies.

So far Martha and I have been spared.  We’ve been using mosquito repellent and candles in our house to ward off the little villains but it is hard not to get bit even with all these precautions.

It’s tough to see something like this hit Haiti.  One thing I’ve learned here is how important good health is for the poor.  Many people work in the informal sector meaning they do not have a salary or guaranteed income, much less health insurance or sick days.  If you are a subsistent farmer or a day laborer, you will not get paid or eat if you do not work.  So being sick can prevent you from earning an income, providing for your family, and taking care of your kids.

The CDC has produced some fact sheets in English and Kreyol which are helpful.  We emailed the Kreyol version to our co-workers and also posted it on our message board in the office.

Please join us in prayer for healing and protection for our co-workers, their families, and for the thousands of others affected throughout the country.

Here’s a couple recent news articles about Chikungunya if you’re interested:

Mosquito-Borne Breaking Bone Disease Spreads in Haiti – NPR
As Haiti awaits confirmation, a quickly spread mosquito-borne virus in Caribbean sparks concern – Miami Herald

 

Why Lending To Women is a Smart Investment

Pignon is neat and clean with a population of around 48,000.  The paved and walkable streets, along with the laid back vibe of the place were a nice reprieve from the noise and chaos of Port-au-Prince, where we live.

Pignon, Credit ACLAM__27

Isidor Jean-Pierre was giving us a walking tour of the city.  He is the World Concern Regional Coordinator in Pignon, central Haiti and earlier this week was our first visit to the office there.

We passed the city’s plaza, which has a small stage and sitting area, where Isidor explained they sometimes have concerts.  “Visiting church groups from other places in Haiti have played there before,” he said.

Soon we stopped at a brightly painted concrete building.  Here Isidor introduced us to Emilienne, a 35-year-old mother of four, who runs a business selling a variety of products like beverages, ketchup, and some food staples like beans.  “Rice and soap are the most popular,” she said, pointing to the boxes of soap sitting at the front of her shop to attract customers.

Pignon, Credit ACLAM__15

Since 1998 World Concern has been serving small business owners in Pignon by providing loans and training.  The loans, taken individually or as a group, give people access to much needed capital to purchase products or other inputs and grow their business.

Emilienne received her first individual loan from World Concern in 2011 and is now on her second.  Although she has had this business for some time, the loans have allowed her to purchase different products and expand her stock.

Pignon, Credit ACLAM__20“I buy the products in Hinche and Port-au-Prince mostly and a truck brings them here,” Emilienne explained.

Her shop is not the only one like it in Pignon.  There are many other shops or stands—some smaller, some bigger—selling similar products.  One of the challenges small business owners in Haiti like Emilienne face is how to stand out from the rest.  So I asked her how she competes.

“There is a shop over there,” she said, pointing.  “Some of my products are 10 gourdes cheaper.”  She answered quickly and confidently.  This was a woman who knew what she was doing.

Around midday we went back to the two room office where the four World Concern staff in Pignon work, and drank Cokes with Isidor.  I was thankful for a break from the heat.

Pignon, Credit ACLAM__33

Our Pignon colleagues–Isidor is the really tall gentleman in the middle

Martha asked Isidor why so many of the microcredit clients in Pignon are women.  “If you lend money to the women, you know she will invest it in her own household,” he said.

His answer was profound yet not foreign.  It is one we have heard from a number of our colleagues around the country.  Empowering women often impacts not only the woman but also her family and community.  

The World Bank published a series of studies, including “Engendering Development” and “Gender Equality as Smart Economics,” where they show that women and girls reinvest an average of 90 percent of their income in their families, compared to a 30 to 40 percent reinvestment rate for men.  With a simple loan and basic business training, women like Emilienne are given the resources needed to succeed.

I need you to step inside Emilienne’s cultural context for a moment.  When I say succeed, don’t picture her buying a large house or a new car.  By succeed, I mean that she has consistent income and thus is able to continually provide food, clothing, shelter, and education to her immediate family and maybe even others around her.   Definitely something to congratulate her for.

Emilienne and her youngest child

Emilienne with her youngest child

A Vet Clinic to Remember a Giant

A group shot at the end of the day of everyone who participated in the vet clinic.

A group shot at the end of the day of everyone who participated in the vet clinic.

There are some people who seem larger than life itself.  Somehow these special individuals are able to fit more into one lifetime than many of us could in several.  Sometimes it’s their zeal for life or pure genius or professional accomplishments.  For Dr. Keith Flanagan, who was known as “Dr. Keith” to many, it was the way he tirelessly spent himself for others over the course of his 26 years of service in Haiti.

I never had the opportunity to meet Dr. Keith.  He passed away suddenly a year ago when Martha and I were new to Haiti and still meeting people.  I wish I had.  However we have had the joy of getting to know his wife Jan who is still in Haiti and attends our church.

Dr. Keith served in Haiti with Christian Veterinary Mission (CVM) which is a sister organization to World Concern.  CVM sends out veterinary professionals to serve in the U.S. and beyond.  Dr. Keith was a vet and was involved in everything from helping the government do vaccination campaigns to training folks in rural areas to become vet agents.

Hold on!  Cows don't like shots either.

Hold on! Cows don’t like shots either.

This past week marked the one year anniversary since Dr. Keith’s death.  To celebrate his life, a vet clinic was organized by the other CVM missionaries in Haiti and Haitian friends who were impacted by him.  Martha and I had the opportunity to travel with the group and document what we saw through photo, video, and interviews so Dr. Keith’s family and the CVM family could remember this special day.

Our good friend and CVM missionary, Rhoda, also participated in the vet clinic.  Here, she and Martha stop for a photo.

Our good friend and CVM missionary, Rhoda, also participated in the vet clinic. Here, she and Martha stop for a photo.

People in the village of Cabaye, one of the three villages part of the vet clinic, gather with their animals.

People in the village of Cabaye, one of the three villages part of the vet clinic, gather with their animals.

The clinic was held in three villages surrounding the town of La Chapelle, a three hour drive from Port-au-Prince.  This was an area that Dr. Keith invested in heavily during his ministry in Haiti.  Around 40 people, many of them community vet agents who were trained by Dr. Keith, came and volunteered their time for the day.  Three groups were formed (one for each village) and a cooler with vaccines and other medicines was given to each group.

Vaccines and medicines iced and ready to go.

Vaccines and medicines iced and ready to go.

Driving from La Chapelle to Cabaye.

Driving from La Chapelle to Cabaye.

We went out with one of the three groups and met all kinds of people who knew Dr. Keith.  One elderly man we met named Julien is a vet agent and was trained by Dr. Keith in 1990.  He remembered three separate trainings, each nine days long, that Dr. Keith gave on taking care of pigs, cattle and horses.  Julien still earns an income from his work as a vet agent, giving vaccines and doing castrations.

julien with animals1

It was really surreal to run into this man named Julien in a tiny village in rural Haiti and hear him say that because of Dr. Keith’s investment in him over 20 years ago, he’s still able to care for his animals and provide for his family by taking care of others’.  After speaking to a number of people like Julien throughout the day, it was clear that Dr. Keith had a significant impact on many people’s lives.

Wiltherne, a godchild of Dr. Keith and vet agent, doing great work!

Wiltherne, a vet agent trained by Dr. Keith, doing great work!

Dr. Keith was obviously a skilled veterinarian and a true professional.  It’s also obvious that he took genuine interest in people and sincerely loved them like Jesus would, whatever their story or background.  Both his skill and heart for others made him an effective vessel for Christ in Haiti for many years.

A time of reflection and sharing after lunch.

A time of reflection and sharing after lunch.

Here’s a short overview video Martha made of our day in La Chapelle.

 

What Would You Do?

Music and songs are one of the languages that really ‘speak’ to me, make me think about life, and move me. Just yesterday I heard a song whose tune seemed familiar (probably because it was a hit single when I was in high school). I stopped to really listen to the words this time. I have to be honest that the whole song is not the most wholesome story but it got me thinking and made a good point. The chorus says:

What would you do if your son was at home,
Cryin’ all alone on the bedroom floor
Cause he’s hungry and the only way to feed him is to
Sleep with a man for a little bit of money?
And his daddy’s gone, in and out of lock down,
I ain’t got a job now, he’s just smokin’ rock now.
So for you this is just a good time
But for me this is what I call life.

What would you do?! We don’t know the whole story of this woman but my mind was already going through questions and scenarios. Surely there’s got to be another option than selling your body to make a little money?!

But then I realized that maybe the point of the song is not the moral or ethical dilemma here. My mind quickly drifted to stories of people here in Haiti that left me wondering what I would do in their shoes.

What would you do if you were pregnant and discovered you have HIV which your husband passed to you? And if you say something you’re convinced he will leave, taking with him the security of an income.

What would you do if you were arrested and put in prison for stealing a goat but seven years later you are still in prison untried?

What would you do if you and your five children were suddenly left with no roof on your house after a hurricane and your limited income kept you from being able to repair it?

At first glance, I just see an HIV positive woman, a prisoner, and a victim. I might even see a promiscuous woman, a bad guy, and a lazy person. But once I meet them and talk to them, I begin to see the humanity behind each face and situation. I begin to see that things often aren’t as simple as they may have seemed when I was looking in from the ‘outside’. There is more than meets the eye—especially my judgmental eye.

I don’t mean to excuse bad decisions. I know that I have made plenty and experienced both consequences and grace. Life seems to be this intertwining of both personal decisions and things that we cannot control.

But bad decision or not, everybody has a story. The more I meet people who are different than me, the more I realize that no situation, no problem, no injustice has a simple solution.

Wendy and her husband visited us in Haiti last November and were able to meet some of the people World Concern works with in the South. At the end of their visit Wendy graciously shared some of her thoughts:

Development isn’t simple. That’s why at World Concern we believe in taking the time to listen to people’s stories. That’s why we engage with the community and local leaders when planning what to do. That’s why we rely on experts in the field. Most of all, that’s why we must rely on God to keep us humble, to keep us engaged, and to give us wisdom on how to serve his children—whether HIV positive, prisoner, or victim.

How television inspired a neighborhood to take action

Martha and I recently returned from a four day trip to northwest Haiti.  I always enjoy traveling; one of the perks of the job.  Sure there are long days spent on dusty roads but getting to see different parts of the country and meeting interesting people in these places makes it well worth it.

One World Concern project in this part of the country is working to establish storm shelters, repair a water system, build canals and gabions, and set up basic waste management systems, all while partnering with local committees.

A person we met on our trip is Juré.  He’s a middle-aged guy with five sons.  He lives in the city of Port-de-Paix and is the president of the sanitation committee in his neighborhood. We had an interesting and varied conversation with Juré, and I wanted to share some of it with you including how television inspired his neighborhood to take action.   Our relatively brief interaction shows the challenges of changing people’s behavior, the ingenuity of low income folks, some general perceptions, and the value of supporting local efforts to bring change.  I hope you enjoy this peak into our conversation and do please share your thoughts.  (Just fyi, these are not direct quotes but rather a collection of questions and answers based on my notes during our conversation.)

Wisley, the World Concern community mobilizer, introduced us to Juré.  His gave a firm handshake.  He was short but his broad build seemed to be an outward reflection of his confidence and determination.  He led us through a series of narrow pathways in the neighborhood until we reached his house, a simple cement home with a little porch.

Juré

Juré on his porch

Austin: How long have you lived in Jerilon (a neighborhood of Port-de-Paix)?

Juré: I’ve lived here more than 15 years.

A: And how long have you served as president of the sanitation committee?

J: Since three years.

A: How was the committee formed?

J: We saw on television how when other countries have a problem, they formed a committee and so we tried to do the same.

A: What is the objective of the sanitation committee?

J: The objective is to change the image of this neighborhood.

A: What are the activities of the committee?

J: To clean the neighborhood and work with children by teaching them how to live.  There are ten people on the committee but it is not enough to clean everything.  The community has many young people but some others do not want to help.

A: Why don’t they want to help?

J: There are always bad people not matter where you are.  People think we [committee] are connected with NGOs and have money to give them but it’s not true.

A: What assistance did World Concern give the committee?

Port-de-Paix, Sanitation,Canal_223

J: We now have shovels, hammers and wheelbarrows [gesturing towards the wheelbarrows stacked on his front porch].  When it rains trash comes back in the canal so we use them to get the trash and bring it to the dumpster.  Then we call the government service to pick it up.  They eventually come.

A: What about the new [recently installed] waste bins?

J: People use the bins in a good way.

A: Do people use them consistently or still throw the trash in the sea or canal?

J: Sometimes people throw trash elsewhere; everywhere there are bad people.

A: What do you do for work?

J: I am a mason and can tile but have not had steady work for three years.

A: Can you tell me about your family?

J: I have five children—all boys.  Here is the fourth one, over there [pointing to a teen boy with headphones standing with some friends].

A: Anything else you would like to say?

J: World Concern is our main backup in this area and can help us bring change here.

The new (and clean) canal along the main street in Jerilon

This may look like just a canal, but this canal along the main street in Jerilon will prevent flooding in people’s homes when it rains.  It’s kept clean and unclogged (a key in it’s effectiveness) thanks to Juré and the sanitation committee.

Keeping people first in life and development

Poeple first Sticker

“I didn’t see you this morning,” Jean said.  “You just parked the car and went upstairs without greeting me.”

My brain was full after another day of conversations in a non-native language and a thousand small things to attend to.  I quickly searched my mind for the events of that morning and then remembered that he was right—I had got out of the car and went directly into the office.

“Oh I’m sorry,” I said apologetically which I followed with the first lame excuse that came to mind.

There was no excuse really.  I simply forgot to greet a friend and co-worker that I greet most days. Although this wasn’t the first time I had forgotten, he was quick to forgive.

“That’s okay,” he said with a grin.  “I’ll see you Friday because I’m off tomorrow.”

This recent conversation served as a clear reminder that I am living and working and serving and operating in a place where your social ‘network’ (don’t read social media here) is highly valued and is for many their most prized possession.  Since this network is a priority, people’s choices and way of life reflect this.

And I had forgotten that.  As a part of my friend’s network I had, in a small way, broken this important yet unwritten social contract.  I didn’t mean to.  I honestly do not remember consciously choosing to not greet him.  It just was not on the forefront of my mind that morning, and as I’m learning, it certainly is not a part of my cultural ‘DNA.’

Haiti is a great teacher.  Sometimes its’ lessons are harsh and sudden, other times they are more gentle and subtle.  This time it was gentler but still a lesson to ponder and the lesson was this—people must come FIRST.

People First Collage4

Personally I know I am not quite there.  I want to be but if I’m honest with myself, I know my love of beating deadlines and creating beautiful spreadsheets and solving logistical problems and writing compelling stories, stand in the way.

Now I realize completing tasks are a necessary part of life and work and ministry however it shouldn’t be what comes first—people should come first.

The truth is I come from a culture that demands productivity at all costs (including relational ones) and that is hard to shake.  Thankfully my Haitian brothers and sisters are patient and forgiving.

This is a lesson for those of us who work in community development as well.  How many well planned and financed projects have failed because the people the project aimed to help were not put first?  It is easy to get swallowed up by logframes, impact evaluations, baseline surveys, proposals, and many more things that occupies our minds and demands our attention when running a project.

However we need to remember the ultimate purpose for all these tasks—to help people live safe, healthy and productive lives.  And how can we achieve that without putting people first?

As a well-known developmentista recently put it on Twitter, “It’s not about the data, it’s about the relationship stupid!”

Austin shaking boy's hand

So what’s the application for development workers and agencies?  Listening is certainly one practical step that those in development can take and it is getting some traction.  Projects like “Time to Listen” and the recent focus on feedback loops are encouraging signs.

Listening is important for me personally as well as I attempt to break free from my tendency to go and do first instead of putting people first.  Ultimately I just need to value these relationships more than my list of to-dos.  A shift in priorities and a ‘renewing of the mind’ is in order.

I’ve been blessed with good relationships in Haiti and I want to see those continue to grow and develop because in addition to benefiting from these relationships myself, that’s really why I’m here—to invest in people.

A couple days later I saw Jean, faithfully guarding the entrance to our office and greeting people as they came in the front door.  I didn’t forget to say hello and ask about his family this time.  I’m learning, albeit slowly

.

Jwaye Nwèl

Warm Christmas Photo

Jwaye Nwèl or Merry Christmas!  We are celebrating our first Christmas in Haiti.

Our tree may not be pine, but it is still a Christmas tree.  There may not be snow outside, but it still feels cozy with friends gathered and some real Haitian hot chocolate.  We may be experiencing some different traditions, but at the core Jesus is still the reason we celebrate.

We hope you have a memorable Christmas this year, wherever you may be.